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Tuesday, January 31, 2012

84th Oscar Animated Feature Updates (1/31/12)

I correctly predicted 4 of the 5 nominees in this category (80%), and could have done even better if I had trusted my instincts that the weak year for American animation might lead to two foreign animation nominees, and paid more attention to those who cautioned that the motion capture in Spielberg’s Tintin might not go over with the animation branch. I had left the film outside of my top 5 for most of the year, but when it was deemed eligible for submission in November I relented.

I believe that this award is Rango’s to lose, but have moved Chico & Rita and A Cat In Paris into the second and third slots, precisely because they have not gone up against the front-runner in as many races, and therefore have a better chance of surprising. It is worth noting, however, that Kung Fu Panda 2 received the most Annie nominations, and could conceivably surprise as well.



1. Gore Verbinski for Rango (Predicted Winner) (previous rank 1)
2. Javier Mariscal and Fernando Trueba for Chico & Rita (previous rank 5)
4. Jean-Loup Felicioli and Alain Gagnol for A Cat In Paris (Une Vie De Chat) (previous rank 11)
4. Jennifer Yuh Nelson for Kung Fu Panda 2 (previous rank 3)
5. Chris Miller for Puss In Boots (previous rank 4)


As always, check the Tracker Pages in the upper right hand corner of this blog for the most updated predictions in all categories!
To see how I am doing in each race, check out my Track Record Page.
See Animated Feature predictions for other years HERE.
If you’re really into animation, check out the Animated Shorts also.
See predictions for other categories at the 84th Oscars HERE.
Switch to another year: 84th,  85th,  86th,  87th,  88th,  89th   

2 comments:

  1. It's a really weak year in animation indeed. Any of the top 3 animations of last year (Toy Story 3, How to Train Your Dragon, Tangled) would easily win it over those this year.

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    1. Indeed, I know that for indie films distribution studios sometimes hold a film for a year if they think its chances are better. But for the animation, the box office from all the kids (plus the parents they drag along) is so high that the desire to make a quick buck probably outweighs this kind of strategizing.

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